Seven Bone Standing Rib Roast Recipe

Posted by on Dec 6, 2011 in Beef, Blog, Recipes | No Comments

Anatomy–The standing rib is the seven bone rib section of a steer. Typically, we use a USDA Prime export rib–which weighs in the range of 16-20 lbs.
Remember: Each bone serves 2 people

THE NIGHT BEFORE

Utensils

Plastic or cellophane wrap

Ingredients

Garlic powder
Paprika
Pepper
No salt at this time

Directions

  1. Remove the freezer wrap and discard. (Some people, believe it or not, have roasted the rib roast with the cellophane wrap on.)
  2. Generously rub all visible surfaces of the meat and bone with a lot – and I do mean a lot – of garlic powder, paprika, and pepper (the odor of garlic should be as pervasive as when you walk down an apartment building hall entirely occupied by Jewish or Italian grandmothers).
  3. Wrap this seasoned hunk of meat tightly in plastic wrap and place it on a platter in the refrigerator overnight.

THE NEXT DAY

Utensils

An instant-read meat thermometer
A broiler pan or cooking rack placed in a very shallow roasting pan

Ingredients

Salt (Optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
  2. While your oven is preheating, take the roast out of the refrigerator, remove and discard the plastic wrap. If you want salt, now is the time to salt the meat.
  3. Place the rib roast on top of the broiler pan or cooking rack set upon a shallow roasting pan. The rib roast itself should stand above the edges of the roasting pan. This can be accomplished by placing the roast bone side down. You want to do this so that the standing rib will dry roast – that is, the meat and bones will cook without braising or steaming in its own liquid. Be sure the rib roast stands well above the edges of the roasting pan. This is the reason for using a rack.
  4. Unfortunately, roasting times are not set in stone. I use 11 minutes per pound for roasting at 350. (Roasting times may vary depending upon your own oven, and/or the atmospheric pressure or temperature.) Anyway, calculate 11 minutes per pound as an estimated time. This is where your instant-read thermometer comes in.
  5. About halfway through your particular calculated roasting time, insert the instant-read thermometer into the center of the roast (be sure it does not touch fat or bone) and take a reading.
  6. 125 degrees Fahrenheit is considered to be medium-rare. Remove the rib roast from the oven at this temperature and let it set at room temperature uncovered on a platter for 20 minutes. (Do not cover under any circumstances.) The carryover heat will continue roasting for another 10 degrees (135 degrees internal temperature). Don’t worry. It won’t get cold.
  7. At this time, the roast may be cut and served. For those of you who want a rib roast a little more done (pink), you may remove the roast from the oven at 130 degrees internal temperature and follow the same steps. Remember: If the piece of meat is not done well enough for your taste, you can always place the cut portions under a preheated broiler for one minute on each side. You can’t, however, take a well-done piece of meat and make it rare, so go for the lower internal temperatures.

Gravy

The best gravy for the meat is on the bottom of the roasting pan. Take all of the pan drippings and place it in a plastic container. Put this in the freezer for 20 minutes, the time the meat is setting. This makes it easier for you to discard the fat which has now come to the top of the container. Boil this in a saucepan and serve over the meat. If there is not enough natural meat juice, go into the freezer and use the beef stock you’ve been storing. If you’re not a Julia Child or Jacques Pepin, buy a can of Heinz beef gravy or College Inn beef broth, boil it, and pour over the meat.

Slicing

Take a knife and separate the meat from the bone. Cut the bulk portion of the meat (it now looks like a phony log you put into the fireplace) into slices and serve. For those who also want the bone, cut in between the bones and serve individual bones on a separate serving platter.

Leftovers

Slice the remaining standing rib into thin slices and serve on garlic bread with horseradish sauce.

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